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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

AIIC: Landlords shouldn't ask for tenant money to decorate

The Association of Independent Inventory Clerks (AIIC) has advised tenants that they shouldn't be persuaded into paying higher rents to subsidise redecoration of their landlord's property.

The AIIC's warning comes after a recent survey conducted by Endsleigh Insurance found that 43% of tenants would happily pay more rent if their landlord permitted them to put a more personal stamp on their property. However, the AIIC has described this as a very "strange concept" which could lead to more issues further down the line. 

They say that allowing tenants to decorate in return for higher rents could lead to a number of possible consequences, including a poor standard of work, potential damage to the property and unsightly colour schemes,

As an alternative, the AIIC proposes that tenants who want to decorate should get in contact with their landlord and, if both parties agree on a deal, then the tenant should proceed. 

“The majority of landlords will be willing to let their tenants decorate, provided it is in good taste and the work is carried out to a high standard,” Pat Barber, Chair of the AIIC, said.

“Of course landlords want their tenants to feel at home and by being handed some creative licence, tenants will be encouraged to stay for longer.”

She added: “The ideal scenario is for tenants to get their landlord's permission and then agree and confirm what work is going to take place.”

“Giving a tenant carte blanche to redecorate a rental property in exchange for higher rental income is a risky strategy and could cause further problems down the line.”

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